How to write html test reports while keeping console output for ScalaTest

Recently I decided that I wanted to have html reports of my ScalaTest unit tests.  What I didn’t realize was that it would *remove* my console output!

When I first added html reports, I discovered that the required a dependency I wasn’t aware of: pegdown.

 

Adding html reports was as easy as setting it in the testOptions:

(testOptions in Test) += Tests.Argument(TestFrameworks.ScalaTest, "-h", "target/report")

As I mentioned above, this caused the following error:

java.lang.NoClassDefFoundError: org/pegdown/PegDownProcessor

So I added the latest version of PegDown to my build.sbt and set its scope to test:

"org.pegdown" % "pegdown" % "1.6.0" % "test"

But then I discovered that I wasn’t getting any console output for my tests!

The answer is to simply add both to your testOptions sequence:

testOptions in Test ++= Seq(Tests.Argument(TestFrameworks.ScalaTest, "-o"), Tests.Argument(TestFrameworks.ScalaTest, "-h", "target/test-reports"))

 

How to create an enumeration in Scala with custom values and names

There has been some back and forth about whether Scala devs should even be creating enumerations to begin with.  (https://www.wlangiewicz.com/2016/03/20/scala-case-classes-vs-enumeration/)

But in the case you wanted to, here’s how to do it:

object MyEnumeration extends Enumeration {
  type MyEnumeration = Value
  val First = Value(1, "Custom Name")
  val Second = Value(2, "Custom Name2")
  val Third = Value(3, "Custom Name3")
}

Happy Coding!

 

How to suppress Scalastyle rules

Sometimes Scalastyle will bark at you for reasons that aren’t always constructive.  For example, the magic number rule is generally a good one except when you are trying to create an enumeration with a particular indexing.  Because Scala will automatically 0-base the enumeration entries, if you wanted to 1-base them, you will need to reindex them.  But then this means you need to set them as below:

object MyEnumeration extends Enumeration {
  type MyEnumeration = Value
  val `First` = Value(1)
  val `Second` = Value(2)
  val `Third` = Value(3)
}

As you can see, the numbers 1, 2, 3 are considered ‘magic numbers’.

So the way to suppress the rule is to a) find the offending rule id (in this case magic.number) then b) make the following change:

object MyEnumeration extends Enumeration {
  // scalastyle:off magic.number
  type MyEnumeration = Value
  val `First` = Value(1)
  val `Second` = Value(2)
  val `Third` = Value(3)
 // scalastyle:on magic.number
}

Happy coding!